This is the final segment of our 4 part series. We wrap up into the practical steps and advise in approaching the court and what should be done if you are going to seek legal assistance or if you are going to go it alone. Also, why the legal strategy taken by Clive was so effective, how lady luck was on his side and what this means going forward. Remember, this case is still on going but we will be sure to have Clive on again as this story unfolds and publish the scores as we receive them.

Clive said “he will probably write a book about how to beat lawyers at their own game. And for people to go by themselves. Easy in the Magistrates court – but one has to know the little “unwritten” procedures.”

In terms of costs incurred Clive describes them as follows:

“Because I represented myself the costs were printing and sheriffs costs and travel. I did get a lawyer to be there just in case and I did see a good advocate. About 7 to 8 hours at about R1,800 per hour. They had 2 advocates and 5 attorneys there and it took an hour and a half to draft the order before I would agree to it. I reckon their legal bill to be about R150,000. We were there from 9 am to 12 pm.

If I had used lawyers it would have been about 60 hours at least. I put in nearly 3 months of legal and technical research and they just do not have the time to spend on one case. I can speed read as well. My legal directory has 1,500 files and my technical directory has 2,500 files. My general legal directory has 6,500 files. I also have a number of books and legal manuals I have purchased.

The first urgent application they awarded costs against me which I am appealing to the ConCourt. They gave me a bill for R27, 000 for one hour of their time in court, and a couple of hours preparation. I opposed and worked out it should be about R5,500. The court must decide, but I will appeal if it goes above about R7,000. If I had a lawyer they would have simply said I should pay the bill.

On Tuesday I insisted that the costs be reserved because I intend asking for costs on an advocates scale. Next week I file in ConCourt and SCA for self-represented litigants to get costs. I reckon I would get about R50,000 in costs.”

We also talk about some shielding solutions one can employ and how it is vital to use testing equipment during your installations. Thankfully EMFSA provides a good support and cost effective rental solution to such equipment.

This concludes the 4 parts interview series. The purpose of the segments is to have everything discussed straight from the Clive’s experience, along with his advice to legal professionals and the lay public. So stay tuned, subscribe on Facebook Niche Radio, Superdads or my site jameslech.co.za . To receive the futures episodes as this and other stories unfold make sure to subscribe.

We would like to thank Clive for being our SuperDad guest and achieving this landmark court precedent. It took a lot of pain, endurance, time to achieve what he did. Very importantly, we need to also thank his supportive family in all this as Clive cannot take all the credit. He was able to achieve this, as discussed in part 1, only with his years of experiences, and support of his family and friends.

All contained within a zip file – Court papers filed, and court order

http://jameslech.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Clive-Granville.zip
NOTE: We are still awaiting the Court transcript. Once they are received we will publish them in a new post. Be sure to subscribe in order to receive them.

Interview part 4 of 4